Round 10 report

08/03/2010
By admin

IMGP2765_lrEuropchess in the pole position before the final round

In Division 4 C, Europchess 1 met CREB 2 which was identified as our main contender at the beginning of the season. However, given the advance in match points secured over the previous rounds, the present match was not decisive for the title anymore. Nevertheless,  Europchess lined up a strong team of Tom Wiley, Frank Hoffmeister, Jenő Czuczai and Serge Le Gal. In the first period of play, Tom and Frank both appeared to gain an advantage. Tom had Black in a Nimzo-Indian defence. His opponent played the 4 g3 variation and, as often happens, he conceded doubled isolated c-pawns in return for pressure on the h1-a8 diagonal and on the b-file. Tom straightforwardedly developed his pieces, and it became clear that the White weaknesses were more serious than those of Black. Frank (with White) played a London System, White developed his pieces to obvious but effective squares and started to probe slight weaknesses on the Black queen-side. Jenő had the Black pieces and played the French Defence. His opponent played the Exchange variation and was clearly hoping to simplify to a draw. Serge, with White, played an English Opening. He started very early on to advance his pawns on the queen-side, but Black developed counterplay against the White pawn on c4. Eventually Black won this pawn and Serge was on the defensive.

Serge defended coolly and, when pieces were exchanged, gradually accumulated advantages to compensate for the missing pawn. He advanced his pawns on the king-side to restrict the mobility of the opponent’s king, and gained enough counterplay to draw a knight ending with a pawn less. This was the first game to finish, ending in a draw, so the score was 0.5 – 0.5.  Frank continued to probe his opponent’s weaknesses on the queen-side. He appeared to be on the verge of winning, but in an unfortunate oversight he overlooked a knight retreat that won a rook for two pawns.  After another wrong tactical calculation Frank resigned, so the score became 1.5 – 0.5 in favour of CREB 2. In Tom’s game all the minor pieces were exchanged, followed by the queens.  Because the Black king could come faster to the centre, White’s pawn weaknesses became a decisive disadvantage. Tom obtained a rook ending with connected passed pawns, and won the game, making the score 1.5 – 1.5. Jenő tried his utmost to exploit his slightly better king position in a double rook ending, but his opponent defended accurately and the game was drawn. Hence the final score was 2-2. This was our first match draw, but with 19/20 match points, Europchess 1 remains on the first place in Division 4 C.

Europchess 1

Europchess 1

Europchess 2 played CREB 3 and needed to win at least one match point in order to relieve itself from the pressure of relegation in Division 4 F. On board 4, Jens Frederiksen on board 4 gained space advantage and better piece play with White in a Philidor-type defense. He later won a full piece, forcing the resignation of his opponent. A good start with 1-0 after approximately 3 hours. Playing his pet English with c4 and e4, Nicolas Rauta organised a pawn-storm against Black. However, his opponent kept cool, and as no decisive advantage occured on the board, a draw was agreed. Raymond Van Melsen defended with Black on board 3 and kept the material balance almost the entire game. After mass exchanges, White could however, build a free pawn supported by his King, whereas Raymond’s pawn on the opposite wing was blocked. This detail decided in favor of White, equalising the match for CREB 3 with 1.5-1.5 after 4 1/2 hours. Hence, all eyes were directed on José-Maria Ramos Florido, who defended with Black a Sicilian. White tried a somewhat optimistic pawn sacrifice in a closed set-up, which did not yield the desired attack. From that moment, José-Maria was in the lead. Having passed the time control, he then took control of the central d-file with his queen and two rooks and was able to invade White’s position. With accurate play, he secured a neat win after a long battle: 2.5 -1.5 for Europchess 2. This means that the second team is ‘safe’ in the ultimate round and will stay in the fourth division.

Europchess 2

Europchess 2

Europchess 3 played against the team of “2 Fous Diogène”. József played black on board one against John Bachir (1500). The opponent played a variation similar to the Anti-Moscow, but he included a useless move in it (a3). Then, when he was already a pawn down he felt obliged to attack and sacrificed a knight on f7 in order to attack the black king. József decided to avoid unnecessary complications and returned the knight but kept the extra pawn. (According to Rybka the knight sacrifice wasn’t correct, black could have defended even without returning it). Then black managed to force exchanges of the attacking pieces and white had to realize that the endgame didn’t offer good chances for him. So he decided to decline the exchange of the queens, but that left open his king and black used the occasion for a counterstrike that ended the game immediately.

Pere (white) was confronted with a passive black scheme with a hole in d5. After manoeuvring with the knights, Pere got a firm control of d5 and a naughty pressure on the blackside with his fianchetted white bishop. Black was obliged to give up the pair of bishops and to allow weakenesses in b7 and d6. After …Reb8?? Bc6, Black soon called it a day.

After ...Reb8? Bxc6! won immediately

After ...Reb8? Pere played Bxc6! and won immediately

Milán (white) started to push his central pawns in the early middlegame of a closed Catalan position and soon it was difficult for Black to coordinate his pieces. At some point instead of passively retreating Black has sacrificed a bishop and soon afterwards an exchange. After the smoke cleared Black had only a pawn and no compensation for the lost rook and he resigned a few moves later.

Kristian playing on the 3rd board once again had the black pieces and once again faced a nonrated player. White failed to take advantage of an unprecise move order by Black and instead lost a tempo with his knight on f3. This allowed Black to gain time to develop and to equalise fully. Then White allowed Black to saddle him with a weak e5-pawn which couldn’t be defended and was soon lost. White had no real compensation but tried to get counterplay on Black’s slightly weakened kingside. It all came to nothing, however, since Black was first to attack the white king, which found itself deprived of the right to castle in the midst of a hurricane of black pieces. Having to decide whether to go in for a clearly lost endgame or walking his king straight into mate, White chose the latter, and so the game ended after 17 moves, so 4-0 for Europchess 3!

In the last round Anderlecht 4 still has chances to overtake us, we need one match point to secure the first place in group 5J.

Europchess 3

Europchess 3

Playing room @ 2 Fous Diogène

Playing room @ 2 Fous Diogène

Playing room @ CREB

Playing room @ CREB

Post mortem analysis

Post mortem analysis

A lost endgame

A lost endgame

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