Round 9 report

28/02/2010
By admin

milanpein_sThe first game to finish was Milan Pein against Marcel Van Cauwenberge (1612). In a Bogo-Indian / Catalan mix Black played precise moves (…Bb4+ after which White plays Bd2 and Be7 retreat is the best Black can do) and White was not able to achive any advantage. On move 18 just before a mass exchange of pieces Black offered a draw which looked a reasonable conclusion of the game. 0.5 – 0.5

Mattias on board 4 had a rather drawish middlegame position after a queen pawn opening. In the early endgame, Mattias, with the black pieces, won a pawn that became a passer. However, the opponent managed to simplify the position so that black could not convert his material advantage and the players therefore agreed to a draw.Just few minutes later Matthias also agreed to a draw on board 4 in an equal pawn endgame. 1 – 1

For the next result we had to wait 3 more hours. On board one, Frank played a Catalan style opening against Dirk Flamé (1840). After the exchange of a few minor pieces, Black suffered from dark-square weaknesses and closed white bishop. Frank used his better development and forced a cleary better rook/bishop ending. When his King infiltrated Black’s position material loss became unavoidable and a nice combination lead to a won pawn-endgame. 2-1 for Europchess after the time control.

Jenő played with Black on the second table against Mr Lallemand ( 1743) and
already at the beginning could simplify the positions with the Staunton gambit of the Dutch defense. After exchanges of queens and rooks, Jenő with a combination gained two pawns which he could further develop with a masterful endgame for full-fledged victory.  3:1  for Europchess 1.

With this result Europchess 1 is already sure to advance to the 3rd division next year irrespective of the results of the last two rounds.

Kristian was playing for Europchess 3 on board 4 and once again had the black pieces. His opponent arrived 20 minutes late for the game and turned out to be a very young nonrated player. Nevertheless, he had quite some knowledge of theory and bashed out book moves at high speed from the very beginning. At a certain point, White however deviated from the beaten paths, which induced Black to play it Barta-style (!) and deprive himself of the right to castle by taking back with the king on e7 after an exchange on that square of white bishop for black knight. In this particular situation, however, this turned out to be a nearly disastrous decision, since immediately after that White with two strong moves put the finger on the main weakness in the black position: The insecure position of his king in the middle of the board! Black had completely missed this continuation and suddenly was in big trouble. He had to think very hard now to keep his position together. Black was thus kept busy defending, but wasn’t out of the woods yet, when White with an incredible blunder left his queen en prise and soon thereafter had to resign the game (20 moves, one hour of play). A pity for the young boy but good for Europchess 3, that got some early tailwind in this crucial match for first place. 1 – 0

Jozsef played on board 1 of Europchess 3 with white pieces (!!!) against Cédric Moretus (1905). In a side variation of the Sveshnikov Jozsef decided to castle on the long side and launched an attack against the opponent’s king. Black wanted to play safe and declined several times the pawn sacrifices offered by Jozsef – the compensation would have been one or two open lines on the kingside. Black being under pressure wasted some important tempi, so he couldn’t develop his pieces on the queenside and his counterstrike in the centre came too late and with little force. Jozsef opened the h file, his rook entered black’s position and won the important pawn on g6. Then, instead of taking the second pawn he decided to play for more and when he threatened with either checkmate or further material gains, the opponent resigned. 2 – 0

On board 3, José María played with White against Roland Brackx (1627).  José María opened with 1.e4, and his opponent played the French Defence.  Although it was a decisive game, José María played with his usual aggressive style, sacrificing a pawn in the opening in order to create a strong attack.  The Black king had to stay in the centre of the board, and although Black tried to defend his position he had to resign just after 17 moves.  José María used more than 1h30  in order to calculate properly all the sacrifices.  A spectacular victory for José María and a third point for Europchess 3!

José Maria and Roland Brackx had a post-mortem analysis which shows that Black had no chance to escape: 3 – 0

Pere was playing with the Black pieces on board 2 against Olivier Baeten (1909). In a difficult middlegame White doubled his rooks on the c-file and Pere had to play precise moves to hold his position. After long maneuvering they reached an endgame with 2 rooks and 4 pawns on each side and after repetiotion of moves draw was agreed. 3.5 – 0.5

A very important victory against our main competitor for the first place in the 5J group!

Thomas playing with White in Europchess 2 faced Thomas Samray (1983) in the classical variation of the Nimzo-Indian defense. White castled queenside but then decided to avoid an attack on his king by exchanging queens which left him temporarily with a pawn up but a much weaker pawn structure. His opponent was then able to further weaken the pawns on the kingside, but missed the right continuation so that White got hold of the open lines. After the exchange of further pieces, Black made another mistake and had to choose between losing a pawn or exchanging the rooks. He went for the latter and ended up in an unfavourable endgame with knight against bishop in an open position. Even more, White had the more active king which soon grabbed a pawn leaving White with a passed pawn on the a-file and a winning position. From there on, Black defended passively and Thomas won easily. That was an important point which secured a 2 – 2 final result and 1 match point for Europchess 2.

Europchess 1

Europchess 1

Europchess 2

Europchess 2

Europchess 3

Europchess 3

IMGP2742_lr

Geraardsbergen was 30 minutes late...

Frank was determined to win the endgame

Frank was determined to win the endgame

Long fight on the first two boards but finally we won both games

Long fight on the first two boards but finally we won both games

Jozsef played on board 1 of Europchess 3 with white pieces (!!!) against Cedric Moretus (1905). In a side variation of the Sveshnikov he decided to castle on the long side and launched an attack against the opponent’s king. Black wanted to play safe and declined several times the pawn sacrifices offered by Jozsef - the compensation would have been one or two open lines on the kingside. Black being under pressure wasted some important tempi, so he couldn’t develop his pieces on the queenside and his counterstrike in the centre came too late and with little force. Jozsef opened the h file, his rook entered black’s position and won the important pawn on g6. Then, instead of taking the second pawn he decided to play for more and when he threatened with either checkmate or further material gains, the opponent resigned.

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


one × 9 =