Interclubs 8th round results

07/02/2010
By admin
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József

Europchess 1

Europchess 1 played in Zottegem 2 a hardly fought match. On board 4, Vladymyr Dedobbeleer achieved an opening advantage with White against a Dutch formation. Rather than taking Black’s weakened f5-pawn, he went for a tactical assault on the queenside. Black was, however, able to equalise and got back into the game after the exchange of queens. After further simplifications Vladymyr offered a draw before the time control, which his opponent accepted without hesitation. 0,5-0,5 in the fourth hour.

Jenö Czuczai played on board 3 with Black a French defence. Both players castled longside and White started advancing his pawns on the kingside. Jenö fought back with a well orchestrated attack against White’s king. He opened the b-file and put the full battery of rooks on it. When his bishop eliminated the defender of b2 (a knight on d1), Black was on the winning track. White tried to rescue the game with his passed h-pawn, but Jenö kept iron nerves before the time control. A few moves later White resigned with a full piece down. 1,5-0,5 for E 1.

On board 2 Frank played with White a Maroczy Sicilian. Black continued passively, allowing White to start a queenside advance, supported by both rooks. In order not to lose a pawn, Black had to concede the g7-bishop against a c3-knight, which gave Frank a slight advantage. Whith Black getting in time trouble, White increased the pressure, first creating a weak d6-pawn and then winning the queen against a rook. Black resigned around move 45 as well 2,5-0,5 for E 1.

With the Black pieces Tom played a Dutch Defence, Leningrad variation.  As is common in this line, Black accepted a weak square on e6 in return for dynamic chances on the flanks.  White occupied e6 with his knight, and after an exchange of Black’s light-squared bishop for the knight, with a pawn.  With an accurate sequence of moves, White might have used the e6 pawn to support the entry of another knight on d7, winning an exchange.  However, he played his moves in the wrong order and lost the e6 pawn for nothing.  White’s position remained solid, but pieces were gradually exchanged and Tom gained the full point in a rook ending.  This was the last game to finish, making the score 3.5 – 0.5 in favour of Europchess.

With this performance, E 1 remains on top of Division 4 C. A single match point in the three remaining matches will secure the title.

VANDE VELDE 0-1 WILEY TOM
MOTTE JAN 0-1 HOFFMEISTER FRANK
VAN DEN HEEDE 0-1 CZUCZAI JENO
SCHROER CHARLOTTE 0.5 – 0.5 DEDOBBELEER VLADYMYR

Zottegem 2 ( 462 )   -  Europchess 1 ( 226 ) 0.5 – 3.5

Europchess 1

Europchess 1

Europchess 2 could not overcome the first team of Soignies…

WATELET SYLVAIN 0.5 – 0.5 RAUTA NICOLAS
OOGHE JEAN-MARIE 1-0 GILBERT COLIN
BOON ALEXIS 1-0 FREDERIKSEN JENS
DELVAUX JULIEN 0-1 MARIAME PHILIPPE

Soignies 1 ( 518 )   -  Europchess 2 ( 226 ) 2.5 – 1.5

Europchess 2

Europchess 2

Europchess 3

József on board 1 played black (as usually) against Patrick Chazard (1705). White avoided the main lines in the Sicilian and played 3.Bb5 and 4.c3. This latter proved to be a useless move and it made difficult for white to develop his queenside. Jozsef decided to keep his king in the centre and to play h5 with the idea of a kingside attack. White tried to defend and attack in the centre at the same time. A sharp tactical battle was ended when after a temporary rook sacrifice by József white decided not to take back the extra pawn but to force a perpetual check instead.

This definitely was not a lucky day! After finding a wrong address on the Internet, Pere was 10 minutes late. That proved to be key. Anyway, after getting a completely won position, but with not much time left before the time control, Pere “discovered” a queen sacrifice that should allow him to deliver mate, instead of playing the obvious winning move what he sadly had also seen. His opponent however just refused twice the queen sacrifice and Pere realised there was no mate at all and the position was not winning any more. Some winning chances remained, but Pere had difficulties to continue playing so, after some moves, he offered a draw after thinking about 20 minutes without finding any winning continuation and beggining to run short of time. He probably was right as, even if the position is tricky, Rybka’s Montecarlo analysis shows that a draw should be the result but black had winning chances if white tries to overpress and Pere was not in best mood to continue playing after the previous terrible mistake.

Kristian on the 3rd board played the black pieces against Bernard Moens (1599). Black achieved no advantage in the opening. Although White didn’t play very ambitiously, he definitely knew standard plans and manoeuvres in the system played, but was content to try and keep Black at bay. Kristian used up a lot of time in an attempt to find a coherent attacking plan that wasn’t too committal, either, but didn’t succeed. He ended up in a position with numerous weaknesses and nothing really to show for it – except for being severely down on the clock. White however wasn’t able to capitalize on his better position and with a series of indecisive moves gave away his advantage. At move 35, with less than 2 minutes left, Black fell victim to some sort of hallucination, thinking that White had left a rook en prise. Of course he hadn’t, and instead it was Black who lost his queen.

Milán on the 4th board playing with white against Ly Piv (1606) chose a quite line in the Grünfeld fianchetto variation. In the opening white has attacked the b7 pawn with Qb3 when black replied Qb6 which defined the character of the game. After the exchange black was left with doubled b-pawns and he could never really make use of the half open a-file. White started to play on the e-file and got some initiative. After the exchange of a rook pair and most minor pieces black got an isolated pawn which was difficult to defend but with accurate play he could have still hold an endgame with R+N against white’s R+B with 5 pawns on each side. Instead black exchanged the rooks and got a passed pawn which finally committed suicide on d2 as it was not possible to defend it anymore. After that the endgame was a classical good bishop against bad knight with one pawn up and after losing two more pawns for nothing black has just resigned.

CHAZARD PATRICK 0.5 – 0.5 BARTA JOZSEF
DETRY DAVID 0.5 – 0.5 MOLES PALLEJA
MOENS BERNARD 1-0 FREDERIKSEN KRISTIAN
LY PIV 0-1 PEIN MILAN

Namur 7 ( 901 )   -  Europchess 3 ( 226 ) 2 -2

Europchess 3

Europchess 3

Namur 7 was a tough opponent

Namur 7 was a tough opponent
Pere had a nice attack against the black King

Pere had a nice attack against the black King

József had the black pieces again

József had the black pieces again

The playing hall in Namur

The playing hall in Namur with 72 players

Kristian and Pere are thinking with József kibitzing in the background

Kristian and Pere are thinking while József is kibitzing

One move before black has offered draw but Pere rejected and played Rf1-g1

One move before black has offered draw but Pere rejected and played Rf1-g1

Pere has tried everything but it's just a draw

Pere has tried everything but it was just a draw

Europchess 1 played in Zottegem 2 a hardly fought match. On board 4, Vladymyr Dedobbeleer achieved an opening advantage with White against a Dutch formation. Rather than taking Black’s weakened f5-pawn, he went for a tactical assault on the queenside. Black was, however, able to equalise and got back into the game after the exchange of queens. After further simplifications Vladymyr offered a draw before the time control, which his opponent accepted without hesitation. 0,5-0,5 in the fourth hour.
Jenö Czucai played on board 3 with Black a French defence. Both players castled longside and White started advancing his pawns on the kingside. Jenö fought back with a well orchestrated attack against White’s king. He opened the b-file and put the full battery of rooks on it. When his bishop eliminated the defender of b2 (a knight on d1), Black was on the winning track. White tried to rescue the game with his passed h-pawn, but Jenö kept iron nerves before the time control. A few moves later White resigned with a full piece down. 1,5-0,5 for E 1.
On board 2 Frank played with White a Maroczy Sicilian. Black continued passively, allowing White to start a queenside advance, supported by both rooks. In order not to lose a pawn, Black had to concede the g7-bishop against a c3-knight, which gave Frank a slight advantage. Whith Black getting in time trouble, White increase the pressure, first creating a weak d6-pawn and then winning the queen against a rook. Black resigned around move 45 as well 2,5-0,5 for E 1.

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