Friendly online match Europchess vs SK Bebenhausen 1992

06/05/2020
By admin

With the lockdown making chess activities on the board impossible, Europchess continues its activities online. Besides the regular blitz tournaments, on Saturday, 2 May, we took up a special challenge by playing an online friendly match against SK Bebenhausen 1992, the former club of president Johannes Bertram.

Bebenhausen is located in the Southern German university town Tübingen. Its chess club is very active, especially in the youth sector, where it could win several national youth team championships over the last years. Its first senior team is currently playing in third division, but has also had seasons in second division.

The agreed formula was the so-called Scheveningen system, in which each player of one team plays each player of the other team once. The time control was 5 minutes with 3 seconds increment.

FM Georgi Tomov, Mark Ouaki, Ralph Dum, Johannes Bertram, Luis Miguel Parreira, Antoine Mathieu-Collin, Leslie Black, Eric Molson and Jorge Pereiro faced 10 strong players from Bebenhausen, all FIDE-rated above 1800 and in many cases even much higher. As Europchess’s selection was more diverse, including players from all teams and strengths, it was obvious that Bebenhausen was the clear favourite, and this was also reflected in the end result. Nonetheless, it was a good opportunity for all of our players to compete with such strong opponents.

Georgi and Mark both scored 7/10 and were the only ones to beat Bebenhausen’s top players, FM Georg Braun (2360, Blitz 2456, beaten by Mark) and FM Rudolf Bräuning (2244, Blitz 2359, beaten by Georgi). The others had less good results, although they could also collect a point here and there.

With 86 games played (some missing due to technical problems or partial absence of players), the final score was: Europchess 24.5 – Bebenhausen 61.5. Congratulations to our strong chess friends in Germany.

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