Belgian league – round 6

10/01/2011
By admin

IMGP5392_lr_cut2Round 6: Rusty start into 2011

In round 6, Europchess 1 defended the lead in Division 3 D with a hard fought 3,5-2,5 against Roeselaere 1. Europchess 2 suffered a heavy defeat (0.5-3.5) against Zottegem 3 and is now trailing at the bottom of Division 4C. In Division 4G, Europchess 3 had to yield 1-3 against the leader of the division, Fleurus 1, but remains in the top half of the Division .

On board 6 of Europchess 1, Luis Busquets Perez defended against the Vienna opening of Kris Muyle (1855). Luis appeared to equalise in the opening and took the risk to castle on the queenside. His opponent then instigated a sharp attack on that part of the board and scored the full point. Despite this 0-1 start, the team fought back.

Georgi Tomov, on board two against Yves Surmont (1996), managed to destroy White’s pawn structure in the opening but had to defend carefully his king. When the first storm was over and Georgi had exchanged the majority of the pieces, the queen and knight ending was better, and ultimately winning, for Black: 1-1.

Facing Bert Feys (1941) on board 4, Jozsef Barta played a very tactical game with Black. Both players left theoretical paths very early on and left their respective kings in the centre. With an excellent pawn move to e5! Jozsef gained ground and gave Europchess the lead: 2-1!

In that situation, the position of Eduardo Semanat Planas against Sander Lefere (1906) was critical. Eduardo had given a pawn with White for attacking chances, which his opponent could only calm down by offering the exchange. Eduardo did not take the material, but continued to go for a King hunt. However, Black defended accurately and Eduardo had to play for a draw in a rook ending with a pawn down, but a more active rook position.

Thomas Wiley on board 1 played a famous “Kasparov” line in the queen’s gambit accepted against Martijn Maddens (2058). He could have created strong pressure on the queenside, but allowed a freeing manoeuvre for Black, after which the Black position was, if anything, more comfortable. In the ensuing endgame, neither side could advance, so a draw was agreed.

With the score being 3 – 2, Frank on board three held the keys for team result. With White against Jan Feys (1955), he gained a solid positional advantage in the middle game and then gave a piece for three pawns. In the opponent’s time trouble, however, he ruined his position, and had to give the exchange to avoid a mate. In the unusual ending, his two advanced passed pawns were nominally weaker than the black rook. Fortunately, Black returned the favour and, in order to avoid losing a piece, had to allow a perpetual check. This draw then sealed the final 3.5-2.5 win for E 1.

Final result:

EUROPCHESS -Roeselaere    3.5 – 2.5


Europchess 2 played a rather strong Zottegem 3. On board 4, Csaba Kancz gained a nice position with Black in a Sicilian against Ruben Smekens (1698). However, Csaba overlooked some tactics and thus lost the exchange. As his swindling chances were limited, the opponent took the full point.

Jeremy Rand on board 3 played against the Caro-Kann of Jan Motte (1732). As Jeremy played very solidly, his opponents offered a draw which Jeremy accepted.

On board 2, Serge Le Gal played the Slav Defence against Krystof Vande Velde (1849). An early sortie of his bishop created some problems, which Serge held under control with accurate defensive moves. However, later on he had to give the a-pawn which remained undefended after queen-side castling, which was the beginning of the end.

With 0.5-2.5 Matias Johannson was defending the honours of the team against Jan Verstraeten (1900).  He played very strongly against Black’s isolani on d5 and got a clear advantage. However, Mattias missed the winning variation. In the early endgame he blundered a piece and therefore lost the full point, unfortunately

Final result:

EUROPCHESS – Zottegem   0.5 – 3.5


With Fleurus 1 the future leader of Division 4 G came to Europchess 3. On board 4, Paris Sansoglou lost a pawn in the opening against Jeffrey Bodart (1551). However, Paris gained some counter-chances in the middlegame and put his pieces on active squares. Nevertheless, the opponent kept on pressing and finally won the full point.

On board three, Milan Pein played with White against Severino Pieroni (1569). When he started to attack the opponent’s centre, Milan sacrificed the d-pawn for initiative. Black had to spend three Queen moves to take the pawn which allowed white to organise his pieces ideally. Milan then tried some play on the queen side, but in a moment of chess blindness miscalculated a series of exchange and ended up a piece down: 0-2.

Kristian Pade Frederiksen held with Black against Thierry Stilmant (1849) on board 2. After an equal middlegame, the “zeitnot” phase again showed Kristian’s iron nerves and a draw was agreed.

This left Luis Parreira on board 1 fighting against Sebastian Marte (1993). Luis gained a more active position in a c3-Sicilian with White and won a pawn in the middlegame. When the game was converted into a Queen’s ending, Luis had a protected passed a-pawn, but Black’s King was nearby. The opponent exchanged the queen’s and steered the game into a drawn pawn-ending.

Final result:

EUROPCHESS – Fleurus   1 – 3


Playing hall (empty)

Playing hall (empty)

Playing hall (full)

Playing hall (full)

Europchess 1

Europchess 1

Europchess 2

Europchess 2

Europchess 3

Europchess 3

This time 3 pawns against a rook was enough for a draw

This time 3 pawns against a rook was enough for a draw

Luis and the Queen endgame

Luis and the Queen endgame

Postmortem

Postmortem

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